WebRoot reports new way for spammers to promote Google home business kits

Andrew Brandt, a malware researcher for WebRoot recently wrote up a new way that spammers used Bing to bypass filters by using Bing’s redirection mechanism for their feeds.

Andrew observed that the problem has to do with how the fact that “the clickable links in the Bing feeds the format http://www.bing/news/rssclick.aspx?redir= followed by the full URL of the site you intend to visit” and the fact that
“anyone can plug anything into the end of that URL and it will redirect to that site”.

Click here to read the full WebRoot article – Spammers Use Bing to Bypass Filters, Spam Bad Links.

A trackback link from the WebRoot blog leads to an  October 22, 2009 article from GeekoPedia which includes a quotation from a Microsoft representative who stated,  “We were testing new features to improve the search experience for our customers, and during our testing, we found a bug that was causing this issue. We are taking immediate action and expect a fix in the next 48 hours.”

According to WebRoot some of the spammers were promoting fake news sites like the ones in the WorkAtHomeTruth write-up “Are Fake News Sites the Next Gold Rush?” – a play on the commonly used fake news site headline “Jobs: Is Working At Home Online The Next Gold Rush?”.

The particular product that WebRoot mentions is one of the products calling itself “Home Business Kit for Google” which continue to pop up with new variations almost daily as discussed in Digging Deeper Into Hidden Negative Option scams here.

Of interest is when Adam says, “Personally, I don’t think anyone should be clicking any links received in email messages” which apparently would include even emails for which people have double-opted in including WebRoot’s own email list here. Now maybe that wasn’t Adam’s intent, but that’s how it certainly reads as of now. And honestly I’ve told certain people that their safest bet based on questions they’ve asked me at WorkAtHomeTruth is for them to completely disconnect their computer from the internet.

What’s amazing to me is how quickly the spammers were able to exploit the Bing vulnerability.

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Comments

  1. colin46 on November 17th, 2009

    I ok’d a 1.97 charge and gave them a credit card number (STUPID<STUPID) caught once never again will I use card on internet. PWW Internet BIZ is a scam on the Stupid. So far it has cost me $220.00. I was able to cancel calling # on my credit card bill and help of credit card provider. another part of the bill was Social Tool Kit 49.95 another scam they indicated that someone phoned me and authorized the kit NOT another lie and I think they were going to send monthly invoices on my card as well although they said they had a compliant dept we see as I emailed them with complaint and had to cancel that charge as well. It cost me the above amount just for being curious about how to make an internet dollar. The fact that they use Google name surprises me that Google has not removed the web site.

  2. I paid $2.97 for an internet biz kit with my VISA card. Since that date there have been three additional charges on my Visa for the amount of $79.90 on the following dates: August 7, 2009, Sept 8, 2009, October 8, 2009 and November 9, 2009. These additional charges were not authorized by my. These additionals have be recurring monthly. I have gone online and issued a FRAUD ALERT immediately.

  3. the creeps have been billing my credit card every month since June 2009!!!! I can’t get a real person to talk to at the number on my card statement. So, I called the credit card company. They have cancelled my card, and listed all charges since June as FRAUD. W?hat a horrible company!

  4. Casee leigh says:

    I signed up for a £1.99 biz kit from Google, nexxt thing I know I am charged £52.68 and I am a single mother living on £70 a week!! HOW CAN I STOP THIS?????

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